Life Giving Water

In Genesis, God provides life-sustaining water through rivers and rain, but human thirst for more than just water leads to spiritual drought. Throughout the Bible, figures like Jacob and the Israelites encounter water in transformative ways, yet often fall into spiritual drought due to their own desires. The prophet Ezekiel’s vision of a life-giving river flowing from the temple represents God’s Spirit reviving a barren land. This vision is fulfilled by Jesus, who offers living water to quench spiritual thirst, symbolized by the water flowing from His side on the cross. Believers, as temples of God, are called to let this living water flow through them, bringing life to others and fulfilling God’s vision of a renewed creation.

Can Anything Good Come Out of Marion?

Many times we believe that how we are perceived impacts if and how we can do good ministry. What happens when we are inaccurately perceived? What is our response? Do we need to correct people’s perception so that ministry can be done? What Jesus shows us is that we can surpass people’s perceptions of us and do GREAT ministry. Before we do that we have to deal with how we perceive ourselves. We need to deal with our own understanding of our identity. Jesus shows us the areas of identity that we tend to wrestle with and what His foundation was for His own identity so he could do GREAT ministry.

People Who See

All throughout Genesis, Abram and Sarai struggle to live as the people of God. In their desperation to see God’s promises fulfilled, they decide to take matters into their own hands. Yet, God’s grace is bigger than their messy relationships and poor decisions, and we will see him come alongside his people as they learn what it truly means to represent him to the world.

The Great Assembly | Easter Week 5

The great assembly at the end of time has begun in the rise of the church.

More Than Forgiveness | Easter Week 4

The Spirit of God breaks the power of sin in believers’ lives.

Holiness and People | Easter Week 3

Through studying the calling of Matthew and the later interaction between Jesus and the Pharisees, we are reminded about how true holiness will inevitably move us to love people by considering the irradiating compassionate and transformational power of Jesus’ holiness. So, the sermon is an invitation to consider our own hearts by checking them through the light of how we treat others. Jesus teaches that our walk with God and the way I treat my neighbor are intimately connected.

The Benefit of Doubt | Easter Week 2

Doubt has long been perceived as that which separates us from Christ. But in the Easter narrative, we see doubt as a regular, recurring, and formative part of the journey of faith. Ultimately, Jesus’ response to such uncertainty leads to the highest point of confession in John’s gospel and models for the church how we, as Easter people, should embrace seasons of uncertainty, ask the difficult questions, and welcome those who are still in search of the risen Christ.

A Conversion on Ego | Conversion Week 5

What does God know about you that you don’t know?

A Conversion of Worship | Conversion Week 4

They looked up and saw no one except Jesus…

A Conversion of Ambition | Conversion Week 3

The way to greatness is from self-importance to self-denial.

A Conversion of Trust | Conversion Week 2

It’s tempting to read the story of Peter in the boat as a simple moral tale: don’t doubt, and God will enable you to participate in a miracle. That’s not good news; has anyone ever manufactured more faith on-command? The Good News is that in this passage, there’s a different invitation, one that helps us journey with the God who loves us enough to come find us in the storm, and then – amidst our unbelief – to walk as Jesus does. This sermon will explore Matthew 14’s fateful night in the boat, and help us learn how we can follow Jesus – walking, sinking, swimming, confessing – into a promise we can put weight on.

A Conversion of Purpose | Conversion Week 1

If at first we “leave … and follow,” everything else comes easier.

Crossing the Road | Pathway to Discipleship Week 6

A disciple is someone who lives with Christ for the world. Now in the company of the Body, the disciple is prepared to bear collective witness to the city where they belong. What opportunities are there for bearing witness to our community? What is available in the Church? What are other believers doing to make a difference in our city?

The Heart of the Question | Pathway to Discipleship Week 5

To long for Jesus and to know him are two aspects of discipleship that rely on our ability to ask and face the right questions. Many people are deconstructing faith and Christian tradition because of their thirst for something more and longing for something new. The church needs to be(come) the kind of community where people adopt the right posture to ask and face courageous questions that lead to a fresh encounter with Christ and a deeper relationship with one another.

Redefining Family | Pathway to Discipleship Week 4

Throughout the gospel accounts, crowds of people encounter Jesus. Intriguingly, in Mark 10, many of these meetings with the masses are followed by Jesus’s further engagement with only a few—his trusted small group of disciples. What conversations did Jesus save for this more intimate setting and community? And what role can this kind of meeting together play in our own formation as we seek to follow Jesus?

Get Together | Pathway to Discipleship Week 3

Throughout the gospel accounts, crowds of people encounter Jesus. Intriguingly, in Mark 10, many of these meetings with the masses are followed by Jesus’s further engagement with only a few—his trusted small group of disciples. What conversations did Jesus save for this more intimate setting and community? And what role can this kind of meeting together play in our own formation as we seek to follow Jesus?

Unforgettable | Pathway to Discipleship Week 2

For every disciple, the first movement toward change was an encounter with Jesus. It was unforgettable. But it was divisive. Whoever met him was better or worse, but they were never the same. What role can the Church play in orchestrating these encounters? How does worship provide the space and the structure? And what must we do for ourselves?

The Invitation | Pathway to Discipleship Week 1

How many Christians actually enjoy the life that Jesus promised? How many of the “saved” are converted? How many are apprentices of Jesus, learning to do easily and routinely the things that Jesus taught us to do? If we were to get serious about discipleship – the believer and the Church – here are four dimensions of that must be involved.

Finding Jesus

Luke is distinctive among the gospel writers for featuring Jesus as a twelve-year-old. This narrative illustrates Mary and Joseph’s commitment to nurturing and raising Jesus, evident in their consistent observance of the Passover. The story unfolds with the anguish they experience upon realizing Jesus is missing after a full day of travel. Upon discovering him in the temple conversing with teachers, Jesus responds to their inquiry with characteristic questions.

Improv | Advent Week 4

Throughout the Christmas story, two things are clear: (1) God is in control, and (2) God is not in charge. This is an important lesson for everyone who feels pushed around by others.