Life Giving Water

In Genesis, God provides life-sustaining water through rivers and rain, but human thirst for more than just water leads to spiritual drought. Throughout the Bible, figures like Jacob and the Israelites encounter water in transformative ways, yet often fall into spiritual drought due to their own desires. The prophet Ezekiel’s vision of a life-giving river flowing from the temple represents God’s Spirit reviving a barren land. This vision is fulfilled by Jesus, who offers living water to quench spiritual thirst, symbolized by the water flowing from His side on the cross. Believers, as temples of God, are called to let this living water flow through them, bringing life to others and fulfilling God’s vision of a renewed creation.

Can Anything Good Come Out of Marion?

Many times we believe that how we are perceived impacts if and how we can do good ministry. What happens when we are inaccurately perceived? What is our response? Do we need to correct people’s perception so that ministry can be done? What Jesus shows us is that we can surpass people’s perceptions of us and do GREAT ministry. Before we do that we have to deal with how we perceive ourselves. We need to deal with our own understanding of our identity. Jesus shows us the areas of identity that we tend to wrestle with and what His foundation was for His own identity so he could do GREAT ministry.

People Who See

All throughout Genesis, Abram and Sarai struggle to live as the people of God. In their desperation to see God’s promises fulfilled, they decide to take matters into their own hands. Yet, God’s grace is bigger than their messy relationships and poor decisions, and we will see him come alongside his people as they learn what it truly means to represent him to the world.

The Second Call

We often settle for the first touch or call, feeling content with imperfect vision or mere proximity. However, God desires us to pursue something more and something deeper – full clarity in our sight and to move from simple proximity to genuine connection with others.

Finding Jesus

Luke is distinctive among the gospel writers for featuring Jesus as a twelve-year-old. This narrative illustrates Mary and Joseph’s commitment to nurturing and raising Jesus, evident in their consistent observance of the Passover. The story unfolds with the anguish they experience upon realizing Jesus is missing after a full day of travel. Upon discovering him in the temple conversing with teachers, Jesus responds to their inquiry with characteristic questions.

The First Evangelist

The first evangelist in the gospels is the least likely, least prepared person … and that’s a why she’s the perfect example of what it means to share our faith in a culture that is hostile to evangelism.

The Future of Love

In his Great Commandment, Jesus shows his genius and authority by bringing all of the feast and fruit of the Scriptures into one seed, bursting with potential harvest. It is the double pulse of the heartbeat of God. He not only pulls in every command of the past but unleashes and prefigures the future of love.

Children of the Day

Toward the beginning of Paul’s career, he wrote a series of letters to young Christians worried about current events, telling them how to conduct themselves in times of chaos and moral confusion. In one of these letters, he contrasted children of the day with those of the night, those who are awake and sober with those who are asleep or drunk. This message is a pastoral word to the Church in our day, tired but awake just before dawn.

Wrestling with God

Christians typically talk about the importance of submitting to God as part of our discipleship. But what about wrestling with God? Not just the cliche, topical-level struggles to believe, but deep conflict with God… what could be the value of that? This sermon will unpack Jacob’s struggle with God, and our own – and discuss how conflict with God–real and brutal –can leave us with a blessing, even as it leaves us with a limp.

Bowman-Stone Park Service

Community Outdoor Service held at the Bowman-Stone Park

Coming Down the Mountain | Epiphany Week 7

What does it look like to “come down the mountain” after experiencing the presence of God? What do we do with encounters with God that we can’t quite wrap our minds around? What do we do when those encounters dry up? How can we faithfully live as followers of Jesus Christ regardless of whether we are on top of the mountain or on the ground below?

Who are You, Lord? | Epiphany Week 1

Paul was absolutely convinced that he was doing God’s work as he tried hard to arrest Christians and stop them from preaching that Jesus was the Messiah. He thought the notion was not only preposterous–that the Messiah would get crucified by the Romans–but no doubt he thought it was blasphemous. He no patted himself on the back for being such a powerful servant of the Lord! He was completely wrong. It is possible for us to be completely convinced that we are doing the Lord’s bidding, fighting the Lord’s battles, and destined for a great big crown when we get to heaven… and be completely wrong. It’s possible for us to be demonizing those who are actually on the Lord’s side. We need to leave room for the Lord to show us where we might be mistaken. Lord, we want to see. Open our eyes to our blind spots.

The God of Bad Ideas

Throughout the Bible, God regularly works in very unexpected ways to the point where those in the accounts are often wondering and questioning what God is doing. Yet God gives insight to His people to discern His purposes that are grander than they/we could ever imagine and always in line with His nature.

Found

A shepherd (leader) is a person who takes responsibility for what is or isn’t happening inside them. But how does one do this when they’re already tired in their work? The last we thing we need is another thing to do, something else to work on. Here’s a word of encouragement for anyone who is tired of working on their own spiritual lives.

Praying on Offense

Scripture repeatedly links prayer with God’s power and activity in the world. Yet many of us have internalized a vision of the perfect prayer life that isn’t practical to the reality of our lives. If Paul is right that we have the mind of Christ (v. 16) and have access to things discerned only through the Spirit (v. 14) it could be that we are over-complicating prayer. Could developing intimacy with the Spirit be the surest way to see God’s purposes come to life in the places we live, work and play?

Rest in the Spirit

Our desire is to listen to the Spirit, to walk in the Spirit, to be empowered by the Spirit but sometimes we lose sight of the Spirit in the frantic pace of our days. Sabbath is an invitation to reorient our lives around a different way of being in the world. This is not a final day of the week in which we fall down in exhaustion to rest but instead, a first day of our week that postures us to notice who we are and whose we are.

Mind the Gap

Between a promise and the fulfillment of it is a gap. In that gap we have the freedom and power to choose a mindset of either “yes” or “no.” And in Christ, everything is “Yes.”

Remember, Trust, and Say Yes

David went from caring for his father’s sheep to fighting a giant. How did he do that, and what can we learn from his example? What might happen if we practice remembering God’s faithfulness, trust God has given us enough, and say yes to God in the everyday circumstances of our lives? Maybe the the more we say yes to God, the easier and more natural it becomes so that, walking in step with the Spirit, we live a life of yes.

The Kingdom of God and the Redemption of Power

From Palm Sunday (“Behold your king comes to you…”) to Good Friday (“Hail, king of the Jews…”) the last week of Jesus life – Holy Week – is the slow and unwelcome rise of a new king whose power increases as his popularity wanes. The story is a parody to kings and their powers. What is the power of a crucified king? How is it different from ours? What are the new “laws of power,” as informed by Christ’s journey through Holy Week?

Shepherding Reflections

Shepherding is not just an activity we pick up when we want. Rather, it is a discipline we grow in, enabling us to ‘love our neighbor’ and care for the people God has placed in the season of life we find ourselves. As we lean into this discipline, we find in our past, stories and evidence of lives transformed, cared for and lifted up to our Lord. We hear of people who have looked to Jesus Christ, The Good Shepherd as their example. This Discipline of Shepherding is not just a celebration of yesterday, it is the way we rise as the People of God toward the future.